Tag Archives | roaning

Reverse dappling progression

GodivaSide

Few posts on this blog have generated as much traffic as the ones about Wing’s Sable Sky, the American Saddlebred with a reversed dappled pattern. (Previous posts about her can be found here and here.) Posts about Sable Sky prompted Julia Bahr to send in photos of her Missouri Foxtrotter Rex’s New Taste of Dallas. Those images showed the progression of the roaning on Dallas as she aged, but because she is a palomino the effect was more subtle than that on Sable Sky.

Soon after that, Joanne Abramson sent pictures of her reversed dappled Miniature mare, Pacific Lady Godiva. Joanne not only had great current pictures, but a series of photos at various ages that show the progression of the roaning. Even more helpful, the base color on Godiva is black bay, so there is plenty of contrast. (For those that have read my book, Joanne may be familiar as she was mentioned in the Acknowledgements. She color tests her entire herd, and posts clear pictures and full testing status, including negative tests, on the Pacific Pintos site. For those with an interest in color, it is a wonderful resource that I highly recommend!)

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Pacific Lady Godiva is homozygous for black (EE) and heterozygous at Agouti (Aa). She also tested positive for frame, making her a really good example of just how minimal that pattern can be. (Extremely minimal frames appear to be more common in Miniatures, in my experience.)  Just what might be causing her reversed dappling is open to speculation. But is is clear that the pattern developed over time. Here she is as a weanling.

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Not in particular how little white there was on her face at this point, compared to her as a mature horse. Likewise, as a foal she does not appear to have white on her legs, yet as an adult she has an extensively roaned left fore as well as some roaning on the right fore. (In the first two images, she is seven years old.)

The early stages of the roaning are visible in these photos of her at age four. Like the Foxtrotter Dallas, the roaning is more pronounced on the face at this point.

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This photo of her back was taken at age six. This placement is a bit different from the two gaited horses in that her patterning is more concentrated along the topline, whereas theirs appears to be more concentrated on the sides. In that way, Godiva is reminiscent of some of the odd Connemaras discussed in the earlier post Ponies Don’t Read. (I have it on my to-do list to contact the owner of Wintermist Sweet Shannon for permission to run photos of her. I have really good images, but nothing runs on the blog without express permission from the photographers, and sometimes that creates a bit of a delay on my part.)

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What I also find interesting about Godiva is that her patterning, at least in photos, is not entirely symmetrical. She is more extensively dappled on her right side than on her left, as these face shots show.

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I should add that this type of coloring does not really have a name. I have called it “reversed dappled roaning” for lack of any widely accepted terminology. Images of Wing’s Sable Sky – both Dee Dee Murray’s lovely photo and the snapshots that ran with the original Craigslist ad for her – have been widely shared across the internet. Many have called her “giraffe-marked”, which is certainly descriptive. It is also potentially confusing because that term is already widely used, along with the term lacing, for the pattern of reticulated spotting in Miniatures and other breeds.

Certainly the pattern on Godiva is similar in location, and lacing is also progressive. It does look a bit different, though. Cindy Evans took this pictures of Ace of Spades, a Miniature with lacing. It is quite possible that his pattern will progress a bit over time, but the way the pattern extends down the sides (and especially on the neck) on Godiva is a bit different.

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But perhaps more importantly, the outline looks quite different. Lacing most often looks like a thin white outline. The pattern on Godiva is wider and has a softer, more diffused outline. (Hopefuly I have not given anyone vertigo by tilting the Joanne’s image of Godiva’s back to match the angle on the image of Spades!)

LacingversusRevDapp

Seeing detailed images of the progression of this pattern was really helpful. I am really interested to see if the patterns on the three horses in these posts – Godiva, Dallas and Sable Sky – get any more extensive with age.

I also have to thank all the owners and photographers who are so generous with providing images and information for this blog. You help make putting together this blog such an enjoyable experience!

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Reverse dapple roaning

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Earlier this year I posted about an unusual Saddlebred mare offered for sale on Craigslist. That mare, Wing’s Sable Sky, generated more interest than almost any other horse posted here on the blog. Since then Dee Dee Murry has taken some professional shots of what I believe is the same mare. This picture shows the odd reversed roaning even more clearly.

I also received a note from a Julia Bahr about her Missouri Foxtrotter mare Rex’s New Taste of Dallas. As you can see from this picture, Dallas has the same kind of reversed roaning as Sable Sky.

RexsTasteofDallas

There isn’t as much contrast on Dallas as there is on the Saddlebred mare because of her pale base color, but the arrangement of the roaning is remarkably similar. Notice the very pale ears on the Saddlebred, which are also pale on Dallas. There is also a concentration of mottled roaning on the face.

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Notice how there is a dark line of color on what are otherwise nearly white ears. In some ways this is like a reverse of the kind of pale spider lines seen on some dapple greys.

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That same reversed veining is visible on her stifle, too.



Dallas is just two years old in these pictures. As a foal, she did not look particularly different from any other palomino tobiano, but Julia said that when she began to shed the edge of her blaze became less distinct and she began to develop snowflakes on her face. Now her body coat has begun to dapple. If the mare at the top of the page is in fact Wing’s Sable Sky, she would be nine years old.

It seems that whatever this is, it is to some degree progressive. With so few horses to go on, it is hard to know what the range of expression might be. Hopefully more horses with a documented history like Dallas will come to light, and a more complete picture of this type of roaning will emerge. In the meantime, a big thank-you to Julia for sending in the photos!

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Another mystery color

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This five year-old Saddlebred mare was recently listed on Craigslist, and her owner has allowed me to use her photos here. Longtime readers of the blog might remember the unusual greys that were discussed here (“Ponies Don’t Read”) and here (“Another Unusual Grey”). When I saw those horses, they reminded me of some a handful of unusual roaned Morgans that I had seen, though they were definitely not greys. This mare, however, is a lot more like the Morgans. You can see their pictures on the Morgan Colors site. The one most like this mare can be seen here:
Sleepys Select Rose
Sleepys Select Rose (winter coat)

I have seen a handful of other horses a bit like this one, all with roaning on the body that tends towards dappling or reverse dappling, dark legs and white on the face. I’ve tended to categorize them as some kind of odd sabino roan, simply because right now just about anything that produces roaning and white markings gets lumped into that category. Of the existing categories, it was the closest match. But it is much more likely that what we call “sabino” is a lot of different things. What seems to be true of horses like this mare is that they are usually connected – when their backgrounds can be determined, at least – to sabino roan families of a certain visual type. Those are horses that look quite a lot like true roans, only they are more uniformly roaned over their entire body. They usually have dark legs and some white on the front of the face, rather than the wrap-around blaze typical of ‘flashy white’ sabinos.

I have inquired about this particular mare’s background, to see if there are similar connections, and will post any information I receive. In the meantime, if readers have horses with extensive roaning and white on the face but not the legs, but that are not true, dark-headed roans, I would love to see them.

UPDATE: The mare’s name is Wing’s Sable Sky. Her owner is in the process of getting larger pictures taken, so hopefully I can share those in the near future.

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