Tag Archives | black pigment

Translating horses to dogs

DogRed

Before I return to basic dog colors, here is a short guide for translating horse color and dog color. I have posted about this a few times before, but since there is going to be a lot of new material in the next few posts, I thought a refresher on this might eliminate at least some of the potential for confusion.

Yellow = Red

In horses, we talk about two types of melanin pigment: black and red. The latter type, known as pheomelanin, is sometimes referred to as red, yellow or even orange, depending on the species. In horses, we use red. In mice, which are the most common model for research on pigmentation, it is referred to as yellow. This is also true in dogs. Because pheomelanin in horses ranges into the deeper tones—and perhaps because “yellow” was once used in some regions to mean palomino or buckskin—red is the traditional term. These are just different names for the same thing.

Red ≠ Liver or Chocolate

Which brings us to the other area of potential confusion. When horsemen talk about red, they mean pheomelanic pigment. When some dog people speak of red, what they mean is a dog like the one at the top of this post, otherwise known as liver or chocolate. On this blog, this type of coloration in dogs, which is not thought to occur in horses, is referred to by its traditional name of brown while red is reserved for pheomelanin.

Seal brown ≠ Brown (b)

Brown is the other confusing term, because it means something very different in horses than in almost any other species. In other animals, brown is an alternate form of black (eumelanin). The dog at the top of this post is the brown version of tricolor (black, tan and white). In posts on this blog, brown usually means the seal brown coloring of the sort seen on the tobiano mare below.

Browntobi

To avoid confusion, when speaking of the non-equine brown I follow the term with the genetic notation “(b)”. When speaking about both, I either use the genetic notations (b and At) or the more specific equine term “seal brown”. (Dogs also have a different color called seal brown, but I will leave that for another day!)

Agouti vs. agouti

In horses, as in other mammals, Agouti is a locus (a specific location on a chromosome) that is involved in pigment-type switching. In other animals, agouti is also the name given to a specific coloration that involves black and red banded hairs. Horses do not appear to have banded (agouti) hairs, but dogs do. The general convention used by this blog is that when referring to a specific locus, the name is capitalized and italicized (or underlined when in a block quote). When used to mean a pattern of banded hairs, agouti appears in regular lowercase letters. This will be an important distinction later in this conversation, because in dogs some of the alleles at Extension and Agouti produce patterns that have both agouti and non-agouti areas. So Agouti is the locus where a number of the alleles for basic coloring reside, and agouti is a specific type of coloring involving banded hairs.

I am also going to post a quick comparison of the canine equivalents – from a genetic standpoint – to bay, black and chestnut. With luck using that as a common reference point, this will not be quite as confusing.

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Black and Red

The last few posts about silver in horses, and merle in dogs, dealt with mutations that alter black pigment without changing red pigment. Those two pigments – red and black – are pretty straightforward in horses. In dogs, though, the term “red” can lead to confusion.

That is because red is used in some breeds, like Australian Shepherds and Dobermans, to refer to what is really an alternate form of black pigment. The same color is sometimes called chocolate (Labradors, Cocker Spaniels), liver (English Setters, Pointers), or brown (Newfoundlands). Although they can appear red-brown in color, the pigment involved is a form of black rather than red. That is why a brown-and-tan dog will have two different shades of red-brown on their body. The brown-and-tan Kelpie pictured above is a good example of this. The darker areas of his coat correspond with the areas you would expect to be black on a black-and-tan dog, while the brighter, copper areas are the places you would expect to be tan. That’s because he carries the mutation that changes the black pigment (called eumelanin) to brown. Because red pigment (called pheomelanin) is not changed by the brown (b) mutation, his copper markings stay the same color. Were this dog not carrying two recessive brown genes (bb), he would be the more familiar black-and-tan.

Red merle are the same kind of color as the Kelpie, only with the merle gene added. Here is a red merle Catahoula Leopard.

Louisiana_Catahoula_Leopard_Dog_-_Red_Leopard

Like the Kelpie, genetically he is a black-and-tan dog with the recessive brown (bb) mutation. He also has the merle mutation, which has merled the brown areas (which have a black pigment, or eumelanin, base) but left the tan (which have red pigment, or pheomelanin) alone.

The brown mutation also alters the pigment in the nose, paw pads, lips and eyes, so that the dog takes on a fairly monochromatic brown appearance. Here is a darker brown German Wirehaired Pointer showing how the nose leather is changed. The dog behind him, although somewhat out of focus, shows that the lips are changed as well.

GWP

Brown dogs can vary a good bit when it comes to shade. Some are redder than others, while some are a lot closer to black. With darker brown dogs, like this Dalmation and this German Shorthair, it is perhaps easier to imagine that the brown color is really an alteration of black.

liverDal

liverGSP

So far, all the dogs posted have been genetically black (or black-and-tan) with the brown mutation. Brown, unlike the silver dilution in horses, does change genetically red dogs, too. It doesn’t change their fur, which is red, but it does change their noses, paw pads, lips and eyes. The extreme piebald Ibizan Hound posted a few days ago is a red dog with the brown dilution.

IbizanWhite

See how his patches are more similar in color to the tan markings on the brown-and-tan dogs? That is red pigmented fur. His nose, lips and area around his eyes are pinkish because the brown (bb) changed what would normally be black to brown. Nova Scotia Duck Tollers are another breed that is genetically red with the brown mutation. They also have pinkish-brown leathers and paler eyes.

Toller

Contrast the nose and eyes with the typical Golden Retriever, and that is how brown changes a red-pigmented dog.

GoldenRetrieverPortrait

And finally, one more bit that tends to cause confusion with the term red in dogs. The Golden Retriever pictured above is a genetically red dog, but most people would not readily call that color red, either. Most genetically red dogs are actually yellow in appearance. That is why, when speaking of dogs, pheomelanin is sometimes called “red/yellow” pigment. In horses, that is not typically used. There diluted red often does look yellow, but that is not common enough that the term needs to be added. In dogs it can help to clarify what it meant by red – especially given the confusion with brown.

(The Kelpie, Catahoula and Golden Retriever pictures are all courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.)

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