Translating horses to dogs

DogRed

Before I return to basic dog colors, here is a short guide for translating horse color and dog color. I have posted about this a few times before, but since there is going to be a lot of new material in the next few posts, I thought a refresher on this might eliminate at least some of the potential for confusion.

Yellow = Red

In horses, we talk about two types of melanin pigment: black and red. The latter type, known as pheomelanin, is sometimes referred to as red, yellow or even orange, depending on the species. In horses, we use red. In mice, which are the most common model for research on pigmentation, it is referred to as yellow. This is also true in dogs. Because pheomelanin in horses ranges into the deeper tones—and perhaps because “yellow” was once used in some regions to mean palomino or buckskin—red is the traditional term. These are just different names for the same thing.

Red ≠ Liver or Chocolate

Which brings us to the other area of potential confusion. When horsemen talk about red, they mean pheomelanic pigment. When some dog people speak of red, what they mean is a dog like the one at the top of this post, otherwise known as liver or chocolate. On this blog, this type of coloration in dogs, which is not thought to occur in horses, is referred to by its traditional name of brown while red is reserved for pheomelanin.

Seal brown ≠ Brown (b)

Brown is the other confusing term, because it means something very different in horses than in almost any other species. In other animals, brown is an alternate form of black (eumelanin). The dog at the top of this post is the brown version of tricolor (black, tan and white). In posts on this blog, brown usually means the seal brown coloring of the sort seen on the tobiano mare below.

Browntobi

To avoid confusion, when speaking of the non-equine brown I follow the term with the genetic notation “(b)”. When speaking about both, I either use the genetic notations (b and At) or the more specific equine term “seal brown”. (Dogs also have a different color called seal brown, but I will leave that for another day!)

Agouti vs. agouti

In horses, as in other mammals, Agouti is a locus (a specific location on a chromosome) that is involved in pigment-type switching. In other animals, agouti is also the name given to a specific coloration that involves black and red banded hairs. Horses do not appear to have banded (agouti) hairs, but dogs do. The general convention used by this blog is that when referring to a specific locus, the name is capitalized and italicized (or underlined when in a block quote). When used to mean a pattern of banded hairs, agouti appears in regular lowercase letters. This will be an important distinction later in this conversation, because in dogs some of the alleles at Extension and Agouti produce patterns that have both agouti and non-agouti areas. So Agouti is the locus where a number of the alleles for basic coloring reside, and agouti is a specific type of coloring involving banded hairs.

I am also going to post a quick comparison of the canine equivalents – from a genetic standpoint – to bay, black and chestnut. With luck using that as a common reference point, this will not be quite as confusing.

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2 Responses to Translating horses to dogs

  1. Henriette November 22, 2014 at 7:44 am #

    Great series!
    Just one correction: bay and brown horses may have banded hairs. They are difficult to find in dark bay and brown horses, because what you see is a mixture of red and black (hair tips). I hope to get a better microscope in order to examine these hairs…
    In bay horses it is evident when hair is exceptionally long, through disease, or in the winter coat. Then it “just” seems the result of agouti production having generally come to a halt. Bay horses, when clipped look gray, chestnut horses light red.

    • equinetapestry November 24, 2014 at 11:04 am #

      Thank you so much for that information, Henriette! I wondered if that might be true of shaded bays or even sooty horses, but I could not see it on the horses that I examined. I did not have the benefit of a microscope, though.